Have you ever had really, really good mezcal?


Mezcal is a distilled beverage made from cooked and fermented agave juice. But that definition barely scratches the surface of this incredibly complex spirit.

Most people outside Mexico are more familiar with tequila, which is in fact one kind of mezcal. All tequila is made from agave tequilana Weber, or Weber blue agave and cooked in steam ovens, usually in the state of Jalisco.

Mezcal, on the other hand, can be made from any of roughly 50 species of agave, and each brings a different taste to the final product. 

Here's everything you need to know about the magical world of mezcal.
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Understanding communication styles in the workplace


The restrictions enforced to stem the spread of the pandemic accelerated several trends, including the mass migration to flexible, remote work and hybrid work environments. Where and how we work are changing—and so are our communication styles in the workplace. 

As businesses continue to navigate the new frontier of remote work, new communication pathways in the workplace are coming into focus. And with these new ways of communicating comes an imperative for new management and technology solutions to help employees work together.
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What's wrong with industrial food


Modern industrial food is literally killing us.

In the United States, 42.5% of the adult population suffers from obesity. Nearly three-quarters (73.6%) is overweight. Six out of the top seven leading causes of death are diet-related.

Our food is ruining our lives, and then ending our lives early. But why?

The catastrophic decline in food quality began more than 200 years ago with breathtaking improvement.

The Industrial Revolution, which would transform the lives of billions, was really a series of smaller, mutually reinforcing revolutions: The industrial energy revolution, the industrial transportation revolution, the industrial chemicals revolution, and so on. One of these was the industrial food revolution.

From around 1800 to about 1950, all of the major food problems that had plagued mankind for centuries were largely solved by industrialization, at least for people in the minority of countries that industrialized during this period. Famine, food-borne illness, lack of food variety, basic nutritional deficiencies among the poor and other problems were largely eliminated for millions.

Agriculture machinery, chemicals, railroads and trucks, factory assembly lines, refrigeration, pasteurization, homogenization, sterilization and other industrial-revolution innovations drove down the cost of food, and increased nutritional safety and variety. Lower food costs, plus supermarkets and household appliances meant people no longer had to spend most of their time paying for, acquiring or preparing food. Combined with advances in medicine, lives became longer, healthier and better.

And then, roughly in the 1950s, the industrial food revolution started harming human health on a massive scale. Here's what went wrong
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