A postcard from post-pandemic Provence


Greetings from Provence! We couldn't wait to return to Europe. So we didn't wait. We landed in Spain early in the morning on the first day Spain allowed vaccinated Americans without pandemic restrictions. And then we flew to France early in the morning two days later on the first day France welcomed vaccinated Americans.

After a few weeks, I'm here to report what it's like traveling in Europe after the pandemic. (tl;dr: It's awesome!)

Understanding the connection between 5G, Big Data, AI and multi-access computing

It's widely understood that 5G is set to transform business. But you can't talk about the coming 5G transformation without talking about 5G and big data. And you can't talk about 5G and big data without talking about artificial intelligence (AI) and multi-access edge computing (MEC). There's a ton of change coming. But don't be overwhelmed. Be prepared.

To oversimplify, 5G is needed to distribute AI to the edge and to devices. And AI is needed to bring intelligence to complex 5G networks. Widely distributed AI, edge computing and 5G all should drive very fast, very low-latency interactions throughout an organization. 

Here's why the future of business IT depends on the symbiotic relationship between 5G, Big Data, AI and multi-access computing

I'm staying on an "Island" in Provence

We're staying for a month in a town in Provence called l'Isle Sur La Sorgue, which means "The Island on the Sorgue." The Sorgue river starts as a natural spring coming out of the ground. At some point, the river splits in two, then re-joins later down the river. The land between the split is this amazingly charming town, an "Island" on the Sorgue river. Over the centuries, local residents have built canals throughout the town to support various industries, and so there's water everywhere (it's basically the opposite of California). 

How Spain vets incoming travelers


Today was the first day that Spain allowed people from some countries who have been vaccinated to enter the without needing to enter on important business. 

The Spanish consulate website said you need two things to enter the country now. First, proof of vaccination. Second, to complete a form on the website for health and travel published by the Spanish government. The form asks all the standard Covid related health questions (have you been in contact with some poor bastard dying of COVID?, etc.), asked if you were vaccinated and also if you had a negative Covid test in the 72 hours before arrival. 

But when I actually entered the country, they didn’t ask to see proof of vaccination They only scanned the QR code on the app, then waved me in. 

You've heard the doom-and-gloom scenarios around cloud security. Here's why they may never come true!

We’ve all heard dire predictions about the future of cybersecurity trends, especially cloud security. IoT environments will expand the attack surface beyond control and encourage breaches. Hybrid offices will always pose a greater risk as cyber criminals exploit flex and remote work. Insecure APIs will open the door to attacks. Attackers will hijack employee accounts. Cloud resources will lack visibility. 

But what if these threats and risks are overblown? Here’s why all these dire predictions about cloud security might never come to pass.

The rise of video snooping as a service

Among the many important aspects of IoT security, live cameras are one of the most open to misuse. People have been video snooping, watching private cameras and doing other sketchy things around connected cameras for many years. But in recent months, the intensity and risk around video have risen.

Video has breached privacy, or even security, in recent months in three main ways: 

  1. Cyber criminals place hidden cameras in hotel rooms or home bedrooms. From there, they sell video clips or even live streams from those cameras online at scale.
  2. Attackers digitally break into a company that provides security video services. From there they gain admin access to the companies’ servers. They can snoop on the live feeds of schools, hospitals and even cybersecurity companies using their products and services.
  3. Threat actors exploit connected video cameras using insecure default configurations and other flaws.

It’s time to explore the potential for abuse (social engineering, blackmail, intelligence for sale and more). 

Here's how you can protect yourself against this new wave of video attacks!