What will these sneakers look like dirty?

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Nike‘s VaporMax sneaker comes in a “pinkish hue” version they call “Particle Beige.“ The bottom looks like bubbles, and the top looks like medical gauze.

The colors clash. But, still, the sneaker you see in this photo is as good as it’s every going to look. Imagine how horrible this will look with the first coat of inevitable grime.

They cost $260.

You could buy them, but it might be faster to withdraw $260 from an ATM and just throw it into the breeze.

We just ordered a robot pizza

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I’ve written about Zume Pizza, and interviewed their CEO. But tonight we (i.e., my son Kevin, who lives in Silicon Valley), finally ordered a pizza, built in part by robots and baked in part in the truck using A.I. Right now, according to the web site, our pizza is in the oven. Good to know.  

Now the pizza is en route. They don’t want me to tip.     

Now the pizza is en route. They don’t want me to tip.  

 

Ok, the idea was supposed to be that a truck full of ovens rolls up to your house and pulls the pizza about of the truck. What actually happened is some dude rolled in a Honda Civic and pulled out pizzas out of an insulated bag. He said the truck is parked nearby. So basically the A.I. trucks replace franchise locations. 

Ok, the idea was supposed to be that a truck full of ovens rolls up to your house and pulls the pizza about of the truck. What actually happened is some dude rolled in a Honda Civic and pulled out pizzas out of an insulated bag. He said the truck is parked nearby. So basically the A.I. trucks replace franchise locations. 

So the speed of delivery was above average — it got here in 18 minutes. The quality of the pizza was average or below average. And the price was really high. So: meh!

So the speed of delivery was above average — it got here in 18 minutes. The quality of the pizza was average or below average. And the price was really high. So: meh!

Simulations all the way down

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I’m sitting here in a Starbucks on Sunset Boulevard in L.A., on deadline, entertaining disturbing thoughts.

I’m pondering Joe Rogan’s podcast interview with Elon Musk I listened to yesterday (they got so high even I got the munchies).

They explored Musk’s ideas about how the world as we experience it might be a simulation.  

Musk pointed out that once you start developing the simulation technologies (such as video games and then VR), they inevitably continue to be perfected until one day they are literally indistinguishable from actual reality. 

One possibility is that some day we will create simulations so good that people will live in them without realizing they’re simulations. 

Another possibility is that some civilization has already created that quality of a simulation and that we’re all living in it now. 

(Musk makes the case that if it IS a simulation, we do not want to take the red pill and live in the real world, because simulations are always far less boring than the reality.)  

It occurred to me (or maybe they said it, I don’t recall) that both are possible — maybe we’re living in a simulation, and within that simulation we will one day create a simulation indistinguishable from reality. 

And maybe the beings that that created our simulation are living in another simulation. And so on. Theoretically, it’s possible that civilizations have been creating simulations inside simulations for trillions of millennia. 

Maybe it’s simulations all the way down.  

It’s a disturbing idea. But at least it would explain L.A. 

American Asians are crazier and richer than Singaporeans

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After watching the popular romantic comedy “Crazy Rich Asians,” moviegoers could be forgiven for assuming that Singaporeans are “crazy rich,” whereas Asian Americans are relatively poor bumpkins.

I’ve seen a similar idea expressed on YouTube comedy videos like this one that compares Chinese Americans as being typically super rich, compared with Chinese-Americans, who are portrayed basically as lower middle class.

Of course, this is all comedy, and funny, too. And nobody is explicitly making this comparison. But it feels like there’s a concerted effort afoot to create a general impression that Asian Asians are rolling in dough, while Asian Americans are poor.

But this just isn’t true.

The truth is that Singaporean Asians are quite wealthy by global standards, with a median household income of $32,360. (The global average is $10,000.)

The median household income for residents of Hong Kong — by far, the richest group of Chinese people — is even higher: $35,443.

But the median household income of Asian Americans is far more than Singapore and Hong Kong combined, at $80,720.

Despite the weird new stereotype that’s emerging, the truth is that Asians who are Americans are by far the richest Asians in the world. And, as Americans, probably the craziest, too.

I love Chinese wine labels

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I wonder what E-Mail wine tastes like? “It’s got a lovely header. And I’m getting hints of spam with an asynchronous quality that’s hard to describe.”

Bonus: This information comes from a blog focused on Chinese wine called — wait for it! — “The Grape Wall of China.”

Love food, wine, travel? And Italy?

More specifically, would you like to go here...

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And drink this...

And also this...

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And eat food like this...

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And learn how to make wine, cheese, bread and this.....

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And see the real Venice like this? 

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And experience a world of joy, fun, friendship and surprises at every turn? 

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Then you should join our upcoming Prosecco Experience. Find out more!